Category: Muslim World

Baghdad: Universities and Hospitals

Baghdad: Universities and Hospitals

  Universities During the later part of the 11th century, Baghdad introduced the precursor to the modern university in the form of a chain of madrasahs which housed students and a salaried faculty. They were known as the Nizamiyah, after their founder Nizam al-Mulk, a Seljuk vizier. The largest and most splendid of these was

Searching for Identity: Muslims in Australia

Searching for Identity: Muslims in Australia

  For at least two centuries, Muslims have visited and worked in Australia. Malay fishers and divers were followed by Afghan camel drivers. However, large-scale Muslim settlement in Australia only began after World War II as a wave of people left behind conditions of economic hardship in search of a better life. … Later events

Latin America: Historical Legacy

Latin America: Historical Legacy

Saulat Pervez It is a known fact that Muslim Europeans of the Middle Ages were far more advanced than their non-Muslim counterparts, thanks to the Golden Ages of Spain and Sicily under Muslim rule. Yet, many people forget that Muslim astronomers and mariners played an important role in the discovery of the New World –

Baghdad: Foundation

Baghdad: Foundation

  Abbasid Caliph al-Mansur founded Baghdad on July 20, 762 C.E., intending it to serve as the capital of Islam and calling it “Madinat-us-Salaam,” or City of Peace. Baghdad was also known as the Round City because it was constructed in a circular shape, consisting of towering semi-circle city walls on the right and left

The History of Islam in Africa

The History of Islam in Africa

By Amadou Shakur The Prophet Muhammad reminded the Muslim world, “We are a single community, distinct from others.” The distinction shapes the Muslim’s religious identity and underlines the nature of the Islamic ideal, whether the purity of the monotheistic concept, the uncompromising quest for morality, or the lifelong seeking of knowledge.  It also accentuates the

Ibn Battuta

Ibn Battuta

  Ibn Battuta, a celebrated traveler, was born in Tangier, Morocco. He lived from 1304 to 1368/1369 and is renowned for his travelogue, Rihla, which simply means Travels. It recounts his many journeys throughout the Muslim world as well as far-flung regions like Russia, China and Constantinople. Along the way, he encountered many adventures and

Umar the Great

Umar the Great

By Salman Yazdani Whenever we talk of great generals or kings of the world one name usually comes to our mind, i.e., Alexander the Great. For obvious reasons he deserves this reputation, but many of us don’t know that there was another ruler in history who was greater than many influential kings in every respect,

Salahuddin Ayyubi (Saladin)

Salahuddin Ayyubi (Saladin)

  Salahuddin Ayyubi, popularly known in the West as Saladin, was a courageous and brilliant Muslim leader during the 12th century. His firm foundation in the religion and its prime values, leading to his commitment to the Islamic cause, enabled him to accomplish great things. His Ayyubid Empire united Egypt and Syria. Above all, he

Europe: The Seeds of Renaissance

Europe: The Seeds of Renaissance

  Islam encourages the gathering of knowledge and the use of reasoning. In the Qur’an, God repeatedly urges humans to use their intellect and thinking skills so that they may differentiate between truth and falsehood.[1] Furthermore, Islam is a universal religion – not for a few chosen people or tribes, but for all people and

Prince Among Slaves

Prince Among Slaves

By Alex Kronemer and Michael Wolfe Prince Among Slaves is a nationally broadcast documentary, which is now a part of a major humanities outreach project.  The documentary is a production of Unity Productions Foundation (UPF) in association with Spark Media and Duke Media.   It tells the amazing story of an enslaved Muslim Prince from Africa