Category: Common Ground

Malcolm X: Lessons to Learn

Malcolm X: Lessons to Learn

By Asif Ahmed On February 21, 1965, the great African-American civil rights leader Malcolm X fell to an assassin’s bullet. The events of that momentous day represent a culmination of a life devoted to the relentless struggle for justice and an unwavering devotion to the pursuit of truth. Born Malcolm Little in Omaha, Nebraska in 1925,

The Big Question

The Big Question

Dr. Laurence Brown   At some point in our lives, everybody asks the big questions: “Who made us,” and “Why are we here?” So who did make us? Most of us have been brought up more on science than religion, and to believe in the Big Bang and evolution more than God. But which makes

The Muslims of Early America

The Muslims of Early America

By Peter Manseau IT was not the imam’s first time at the rodeo. Scheduled to deliver an invocation at the Fort Worth Stock Show and Rodeo last week, Moujahed Bakhach of the local Islamic Association of Tarrant County canceled his appearance because of the backlash brought on by a prayer he had offered a few days before.

Islamic center opens its doors for ‘Meet Your Muslim Neighbor’ event

Islamic center opens its doors for ‘Meet Your Muslim Neighbor’ event

By Will Healey The Islamic Society of Greater Chattanooga held “Meet Your Muslim Neighbor,” an open house for members of all belief systems to learn about the religion over coffee and snacks, at the I.S.G.C. Center on Gunbarrel Road on Saturday. Dozens of people were spaced throughout the center’s large gymnasium, munching and mingling, while

A Shared Golden Age

A Shared Golden Age

By Saulat Pervez When the Muslims conquered Spain in 711 C.E., Jewish people were relieved from the persecution of their Visigoth Christian rulers and enjoyed a time of full religious liberty. While they had survived centuries of marginalization under Christian rule, the dawn of tolerance in Muslim Spain enabled them to thrive. Thus began a

Muslim UCF students combat hate with peace

Muslim UCF students combat hate with peace

By Adam Rhodes A dirty look, a glare, people muttering under their breath. Imagine all of this happening simply because you’re Muslim or you’re wearing a hijab. According to the Pew Research Center, there are 1.6 billion Muslim citizens around the world, which makes up 23 percent of the world’s population. Additionally, 13.7 percent of

Why We Need the Islamic Call to Prayer at American Universities

Why We Need the Islamic Call to Prayer at American Universities

By Jordan Denari The average college student spends eight to 10 hours a day on a smartphone. Eighty percent of college students report feeling frequently stressed, and one in 10 have been diagnosed with anxiety, depression or other mental disorders. Like the rest of the country, universities are fraught with busyness and competing distractions. Students rush around, faces buried

Belief in Divine Books

Belief in Divine Books

    Quran – an intricate and beautiful book that is a light, a warning, a promise for Muslims. It was divinely revealed over fourteen hundred years ago. Ever since, the Quran remains a Muslim’s solace, hope, and guide. Quran, the holy book of Islam The Quran, the holy book of Islam, was given to

Duke Muslims And Non-Muslims Join For Call To Prayer

Duke Muslims And Non-Muslims Join For Call To Prayer

By Yonat Shimron DURHAM, N.C. (RNS) In the end, the Muslim call to prayer was broadcast from a small black speaker perched on the steps of the Duke Chapel Friday (Jan. 16), as hundreds of students, some Muslim but mostly non-Muslim, gathered in solidarity for the right of all students to pray publicly. The gathering,

Islam does not preach violence

Islam does not preach violence

By Saulat Pervez I recently attended a library event highlighting Muslim heritage where a gentleman asked, “Would you say that the acts of ISIS represent true Islam and that the rest of the billion-plus Muslim population is in fact deviating from the actual teachings of Muhammad?” When the coordinator responded with a firm, “No,” the